Domestic/Intimate Partner Violence Initiative

We aim to prevent domestic and intimate partner violence (DIPV), improve system response to DIPV, and expand support for survivors of DIPV. In pursuit of these goals, we conduct research, build collaboration, and take targeted action. Read on to learn more about the importance of addressing domestic/intimate partner violence in Detroit, our current efforts, and how you can help support this work.

THE NEED

In 2016, 10,012 crimes involving domestic violence were reported to the Detroit Police Department (DPD), resulting in an estimated cost of $446 million. Domestic/intimate partner violence may result in physical injury or death and generates costs associated with medical and mental health care, lost earnings, decreased quality of life, policing, incarceration, and other criminal justice system expenses. From 2008 to 2015, the city of Detroit experienced an unprecedented 30% reduction in the total number of reported Part I violent crimes. However, during this period of overall declining violence, reported crimes involving intimate partners increased, signaling a need for a new and effective approach. Achieving further reductions in Detroit’s violent crime requires reducing DIPV, which accounts for approximately 35% of the city’s aggravated assaults. In comparison to national statistics that attribute 15% of violent crimes to domestic violence, that proportion is doubled in Detroit. Recognizing that domestic/intimate partner violence in Detroit has remained stubbornly unaffected by traditional interventions, the Center began to explore the intricacies of the problem through systematic interviews of leaders in the advocacy and criminal justice community, literature reviews, and work groups. From this, the Center has collaborated with community stakeholders, law enforcement, and other partners to develop and implement programs to address this pressing issue.

THE WORK

AmeriCorps Urban Safety Domestic Violence Advocate Program (AMUS DV) The AmeriCorps Urban Safety Domestic Violence Advocate program embeds advocates in DPD Precinct offices to support DIPV survivors and increase DIPV awareness of law enforcement and community groups. Our advocate members are often the first people to reach out to survivors after a police report, which enables us to provide quick direction on the complex navigation of the criminal justice system. Regardless of survivors’ decisions to pursue criminal prosecution, advocate members offer assistance with developing personalized safety plans, petitions for personal protection orders (PPOs), and connection to other supportive services, such as counseling and shelter.

IPV High-Risk Alert System (HRA)

The IPV High Risk Alert System is a tracking and communication system that will allow for the review of a large number of high-risk DIPV cases in a short period of time, innovate the way urgent information is communicated to key partners, contribute to increased interagency coordination amongst law enforcement, social services and the judicial system, and lead to an increase in DIPV prevention efforts. On average, emergency dispatchers in Detroit field 180 calls per day related to family trouble—that is one call every 8 minutes. With such a large volume of new incidents being reported every day, high-risk cases where there is repeated or escalating assaultive behavior may not receive the urgent coordinated action required to prevent severe future violence. The innovative HRA will help WSU and the Detroit Police Department to prioritize DIPV cases based on data gathered through criminal histories as well as evidence-based lethality indicators. Additionally, the HRA will reduce the time it takes for high-risk cases to move through a resource-deficient system.

Wayne County Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team (FRT)

The Center initiated and coordinates the Wayne County Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team. Authorized by the Domestic Violence Act, 1978 PA 389, MCL 400.1511, the review team is charged with reviewing homicides and near fatal-incidents which resulted from intimate partner violence in Wayne County. Its mission is to prevent future DIPV cases from escalating into murder or suicide by creating system change recommendations. Representatives from local and state level non-profits and government agencies participate in bi-monthly meetings to conduct case reviews, develop recommendations, and produce materials to share information.

High Impact Offender strategy (HIO)

Incidents of DIPV are rarely isolated occurrences. Center researchers analyzed historical data in the DPD’s crime reporting database and found that many DIPV suspects have lengthy criminal histories of DIPV as well as other non-DIPV crimes. Likewise, many DIPV suspects were under Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC) supervision (on probation or parole) at the time of the reported incident. Such High Impact Offenders are featured at community CompStat safety meetings, facilitating targeted intervention to prevent future crimes.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Donate Information is not as free as you may think. Please contribute to spreading this information by visiting http://www.cus.wayne.edu/donate, select "Other" and type “domestic violence awareness.” Volunteer Join our team! We have on-going openings for AmeriCorps & internship opportunities. Download Informational Materials Resource Card Poster Brochure